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Just the Facts

Immigration Fact Checks provide up-to-date information on the most current issues involving immigration today.

The District of Columbia: Immigrant Entrepreneurs and Welcoming Initiatives in the Capital

In the District of Columbia, there is no doubt that immigrant entrepreneurs and innovators play an important role. Immigrant entrepreneurs bring in additional revenue, create jobs, and contribute significantly to the region’s economy. Highly skilled immigrants are vital to the district’s innovation industries, helping to boost local economies. Furthermore, local government, business, and non-profit leaders recognize the importance of immigrants in their community and support immigration through local “welcoming” and integration initiatives.

Immigrant entrepreneurs contribute significantly to the District of Columbia’s economy.

  • From 2006 to 2010, there were 4,003 new immigrant business owners in District of Columbia, and in 2010, 19.2 percent of all business owners in the District of Columbia were foreign-born.
  • In 2010, new immigrant business owners had a total net business income of $242 million, which is 10.8 percent of all net business income in the state.
  • In 2010, the foreign-born share of business owners was 33 percent in the Washington, D.C. metropolitan area, which includes the District of Columbia and parts of northern Virginia and Maryland.

Highly skilled immigrants are vital to the District of Columbia’s innovation industries, which in turn helps lead American innovation and creates jobs.Read more...

Published On: Thu, Jul 11, 2013 | Download File

Maryland: Immigrant Entrepreneurs, Innovation, and Welcoming Initiatives in the Old Line State

In Maryland, there is no doubt that immigrant entrepreneurs and innovators play an important role. Immigrant entrepreneurs bring in additional revenue, create jobs, and contribute significantly to the state’s economy. Highly skilled immigrants are vital to the state’s innovation industries, and to the metropolitan areas within the state, helping to boost local economies. Furthermore, local government, business, and non-profit leaders recognize the importance of immigrants in their communities and support immigration through local “welcoming” and integration initiatives.

Immigrant entrepreneurs contribute to Maryland’s economy. Read more...

Published On: Tue, Jul 09, 2013 | Download File

Georgia: Immigrant Entrepreneurs, Innovation, and Welcoming Initiatives in the Peach State

In Georgia, there is no doubt that immigrant entrepreneurs and innovators play an important role. Immigrant entrepreneurs bring in additional revenue, create jobs, and contribute significantly to the state’s economy. Highly skilled immigrants are vital to the state’s innovation industries and to the metropolitan areas within the state, helping to boost local economies. Furthermore, local government, business, and non-profit leaders recognize the importance of immigrants in their communities and support immigration through local “welcoming” and integration initiatives.

Immigrant entrepreneurs contribute significantly to Georgia’s economy. Read more...

Published On: Tue, Jul 02, 2013 | Download File

Oregon: Immigrant Entrepreneurs, Innovation, and Welcoming Initiatives in the Beaver State

In Oregon, there is no doubt that immigrant entrepreneurs and innovators play an important role. Immigrant entrepreneurs bring in additional revenue, create jobs, and contribute significantly to the state’s economy. Highly skilled immigrants are vital to the state’s innovation industries and to the metropolitan areas within the state, helping to boost local economies. Furthermore, local government, business, and non-profit leaders recognize the importance of immigrants in their communities and support immigration through local “welcoming” and integration initiatives.

Immigrant entrepreneurs contribute significantly to Oregon’s economy. Read more...

Published On: Tue, Jul 02, 2013 | Download File

New Jersey: Immigrant Entrepreneurs, Innovation, and Welcoming Initiatives in the Garden State

In New Jersey, there is no doubt that immigrant entrepreneurs and innovators play an important role. Immigrant entrepreneurs bring in additional revenue, create jobs, and contribute significantly to the state’s economy. Highly skilled immigrants are vital to the state’s innovation industries and to the metropolitan areas within the state, helping to boost local economies. Furthermore, local government, business, and non-profit leaders recognize the importance of immigrants in their communities and support immigration through local “welcoming” and integration initiatives.

Immigrant entrepreneurs contribute significantly to New Jersey’s economy. Read more...

Published On: Tue, Jul 02, 2013 | Download File

Tennessee: Immigrant Entrepreneurs, Innovation, and Welcoming Initiatives in the Volunteer State

In Tennessee, there is no doubt that immigrant entrepreneurs and innovators play an important role. Immigrant entrepreneurs bring in additional revenue, create jobs, and contribute significantly to the state’s economy. Highly skilled immigrants are vital to the state’s innovation industries and to the metropolitan areas within the state, helping to boost local economies. Furthermore, local government, business, and non-profit leaders recognize the importance of immigrants in their communities and support immigration through local “welcoming” and integration initiatives.

Immigrant entrepreneurs contribute significantly to Tennessee’s economy.

  • From 2006 to 2010, there were 15,369 new immigrant business owners in Tennessee, and in 2010, 7.2 percent of all business owners in Tennessee were foreign-born.
  • In 2010, new immigrant business owners had total net business income of $851 million, which is 5.6 percent of all net business income in the state.
  • Tennessee is home to many successful companies with at least one founder who was an immigrant or child of an immigrant, including International Paper. This company, which ranks 111th in the 2012 Fortune 500, employs 60,000 people worldwide, including 2,000 at its headquarters in Memphis.

Highly skilled immigrants are vital to Tennessee’s innovation industries, which in turn helps lead American innovation and creates jobs.Read more...

Published On: Tue, Jul 02, 2013 | Download File

Washington: Immigrant Entrepreneurs, Innovation, and Welcoming Initiatives in the Evergreen State

In Washington, there is no doubt that immigrant entrepreneurs and innovators play an important role. Immigrant entrepreneurs bring in additional revenue, create jobs, and contribute significantly to the state’s economy. Highly skilled immigrants are vital to the state’s innovation industries and to the metropolitan areas within the state, helping to boost local economies. Furthermore, local government, business, and non-profit leaders recognize the importance of immigrants in their communities and support immigration through local “welcoming” and integration initiatives.

Immigrant entrepreneurs contribute significantly to Washington’s economy. Read more...

Published On: Tue, Jul 02, 2013 | Download File

Missouri: Immigrant Entrepreneurs, Innovation, and Welcoming Initiatives in the Show Me State

In Missouri, there is no doubt that immigrant entrepreneurs and innovators play an important role. Immigrant entrepreneurs bring in additional revenue, create jobs, and contribute significantly to the state’s economy. Highly skilled immigrants are vital to the state’s innovation industries and to the metropolitan areas within the state, helping to boost local economies. Furthermore, local government, business, and non-profit leaders recognize the importance of immigrants in their communities and support immigration through local “welcoming” and integration initiatives.

Immigrant entrepreneurs contribute significantly to Missouri’s economy. Read more...

Published On: Tue, Jul 02, 2013 | Download File

The Power of Reform: CBO Report Quantifies the Economic Benefits of the Senate Immigration Bill

According to the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) and Joint Committee on Taxation (JCT), the fiscal and economic effects of the Senate immigration reform bill (S. 744) would be overwhelmingly positive. If enacted, the bill would help reduce the federal budget deficit by approximately $1 trillion over 20 years, would boost the U.S. economy as whole without negatively affecting U.S. workers, and would greatly reduce future undocumented immigration. These are the conclusions laid out in three reports released in June and July 2013. On June 18, the CBO issued two reports on the version of S. 744 that was reported out of the Senate Judiciary Committee on May 28. The first one analyzes (or “scores”) the fiscal impact of the bill over the next 20 years and the second one focuses on the impact that some aspects of the bill would have on the U.S. economy. On July 3, the CBO issued a revised score on the version of the bill that passed the Senate on June 27. This version includes the Corker-Hoeven “border surge” amendment, which calls for a significant increase in border-enforcement spending.

What is a CBO score and what are its main implications?

Nearly every bill that is approved by a full committee of either house of Congress is subject to a formal cost estimate by the CBO. The report produced as a result of this analysis is known as the CBO “score.” The purpose of this analysis is to aid in economic and budgetary decisions on a wide assortment of programs covered by the federal budget. In general, the CBO estimates what the net fiscal impact of a bill would be, considering both the costs and the benefits associated with its implementation.Read more...

Published On: Thu, Jun 20, 2013 | Download File

The Economic Blame Game: Immigration and Unemployment

Contrary to the claims of critics, the immigration bill now winding its way through the Senate would not add to the ranks of the unemployed. In fact, both the legalization and “future flow” provisions of the bill would empower immigrant workers to spend more, invest more, and pay more in taxes—all of which would create new jobs. Put differently, employment is not a “zero sum” game in which workers compete for some fixed number of jobs. All workers are also consumers, taxpayers, and—in many cases—entrepreneurs who engage in job-creating economic activity every day.

Nevertheless, one of the most persistent myths about the economics of immigration is that every immigrant added to the U.S. labor force amounts to a job lost by a native-born worker, or that every job loss for a native-born worker is evidence that there is need for one less immigrant worker. However, this is not how labor-force dynamics work in the real world. The notion that unemployed natives could simply be “swapped” for employed immigrants is not economically valid. In reality, native workers and immigrant workers are not easily interchangeable. Even if unemployed native workers were willing to travel across the country or take jobs for which they are overqualified, that is hardly a long-term strategy for economic recovery.

There is no direct correlation between immigration and unemployment.Read more...

Published On: Wed, Jun 12, 2013 | Download File