Skip to Content

Programs:

Just the Facts

Immigration Fact Checks provide up-to-date information on the most current issues involving immigration today.

New Americans in Nevada

Nevada ThumbThe Political and Economic Power of Immigrants, Latinos, and Asians in the Silver State (Updated 2015)

Download the Fact Sheet 

Download the Infographic

View the Innovation and Entrepreneurship Fact Sheet for Nevada

 

Read more...

Published On: Thu, Jan 01, 2015 | Download File

New Americans in Wyoming

Wyoming 2013The Economic Power of Immigrants, Latinos, and Asians in the Equality State (Updated 2015)

Download the Fact Sheet 

Download the Infographic

View the Innovation and Entrepreneurship Fact Sheet for Wyoming

 

Read more...

Published On: Thu, Jan 01, 2015 | Download File

New Americans in Minnesota

Minnesota ThumbThe Political and Economic Power of Immigrants, Latinos, and Asians in the North Star State (Updated 2015)

Download the Fact Sheet (Updated 2015)

Download the Infographic

View the Innovation and Entrepreneurship Fact Sheet for Minnesota

 

Read more...

Published On: Thu, Jan 01, 2015 | Download File

New Americans in New Mexico

New Mexico ThumbThe Political and Economic Power of Immigrants, Latinos, and Asians in the Land of Enchantment (Updated 2015)

Download the Fact Sheet

Download the Infographic

View the Innovation and Entrepreneurship Fact Sheet for New Mexico

 

Read more...

Published On: Thu, Jan 01, 2015 | Download File

New Americans in Tennessee

Tennessee ThumbThe Political and Economic Power of Immigrants, Latinos, and Asians in the Volunteer State (Updated 2015)

Download the Fact Sheet

Download the Infographic

View the Innovation and Entrepreneurship Fact Sheet for Tennessee

 

Read more...

Published On: Thu, Jan 01, 2015 | Download File

Reagan-Bush Family Fairness: A Chronological History

From 1987 to 1990, Presidents Ronald Reagan and George Bush, Sr. used their executive authority to protect from deportation a group that Congress left out of its 1986 immigration reform legislation—the spouses and children of individuals who were in the process of legalizing. These “Family Fairness” actions were taken to avoid separating families in which one spouse or parent was eligible for legalization, but the other spouse or children living in the United States were not—and thus could be deported, even though they would one day be eligible for legal status when the spouse or parent legalized. Publicly available estimates at the time were that “Family Fairness” could cover as many as 1.5 million family members, which was approximately 40 percent of the then-unauthorized population. After Reagan and Bush acted, Congress later protected the family members. This fact sheet provides a chronological history of the executive actions and legislative debate surrounding Family Fairness.

November 6, 1986:

 

President Reagan signs the Simpson-Mazzoli Immigration Reform and Control Act (IRCA). The legislation makes certain immigrants eligible for temporary legal status and eventually green cards, primarily (1) those “continuously” present in the U.S. since January 1, 1982 (the general legalization provisions), and (2) special agricultural workers (SAW). At the time, roughly 3 million people are thought to be eligible to legalize, although that number will rise by 1990, due to an unexpectedly large number of SAW applicants, and litigation by several hundred thousand persons who claimed eligibility for the general legalization provisions.Read more...

Published On: Tue, Dec 09, 2014 | Download File

Executive Grants of Temporary Immigration Relief, 1956-Present

Much has been made of President Obama’s Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program, through which he deferred deportation for young adults brought to the U.S. as children. But as immigration legal scholar Hiroshi Motomura has noted, the president has broad executive authority to shape the enforcement and implementation of immigration laws, including exercising prosecutorial discretion to defer deportations and streamline certain adjudications. In fact, history books reveal that President Obama’s action follows a long line of presidents who relied on their executive branch authority to address immigration challenges. Read more...

Published On: Thu, Oct 02, 2014 | Download File

Immigrant Women in the United States: A Portrait of Demographic Diversity

There are more than 20 million immigrant women and girls in the United States today, and they are a formidable presence in U.S. society and the U.S. economy. Immigrant women come from every corner of the globe and slightly outnumber immigrant men. Read more...

Published On: Wed, Sep 10, 2014 | Download File

Asylum in the United States

Asylum is a protection granted to foreign nationals already in the United States or at the border who meet the international definition of a “refugee.” A refugee is defined as a person who has been persecuted or has a well-founded fear of being persecuted “on account of race, religion, nationality, membership in a particular social group, or political opinion.” This definition derives from the United Nations 1951 Convention and 1967 Protocols (“Convention and Protocols”)—international agreements to which the United States is a signatory. Congress incorporated this definition into U.S. immigration law in the Refugee Act of 1980. Also, the Convention and Protocols and U.S. law protect the asylum-seeker from “non-refoulement.” In other words, under international law, a country cannot return or expel people to places where their lives or freedoms could be in jeopardy. Asylum status is granted by asylum officers or immigration judges. In FY 2012, 29,484 individuals were granted asylum.

There are two asylum processes in the United States: the affirmative process and the defensive process.Read more...

Published On: Wed, Aug 27, 2014 | Download File

Unauthorized Immigrants Today: A Demographic Profile

With Congress gridlocked on immigration reform, all eyes have turned to the White House to implement administrative reforms that will address some of the consequences of years of legislative stalemates. While it remains to be seen what those fixes will be, the central question—as always—will be what to do about some or all of the estimated 11.7 million unauthorized immigrants now living in the United States. Tackling this issue effectively involves overcoming a common misperception that unauthorized immigrants consist primarily of barely literate, single young men who have recently crossed the southern border and live solitary lives disconnected from U.S. society. The truth, however, is that unauthorized immigrants include adults and children, mothers and fathers, homeowners and people of faith, most of whom are invested in their communities.Read more...

Published On: Tue, Aug 19, 2014 | Download File