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The Economics of Necessity: Economic Report of the President Underscores Importance of Immigration

Although immigration is crucial to the growth of the U.S. labor force and yields a net fiscal benefit to the U.S. economy, current immigration policies fail to respond to actual labor demand.

Published On: Sun, May 01, 2005 | Download File

Fencing in Failure: Effective Border Control is Not Achieved by Building More Fences

New proposals for more fencing and Border Patrol agents along the U.S.-Mexico border may only perpetuate an unsuccessful and counterproductive policy that does not effectively enhance national security or control undocumented immigration.

Published On: Fri, Apr 01, 2005 | Download File

Asylum Essentials:The U.S. Asylum Program Needs More Resources, Not Restrictions

The efficiency of the asylum program depends in large part on a fully staffed and adequately funded Asylum Corps that evaluates asylum claims thoroughly and expeditiously.

Published On: Tue, Feb 01, 2005 | Download File

Closed Borders and Mass Deportations: The Lessons of the Barred Zone Act

The Barred Zone Act of February 4, 1917, offers a cautionary lesson against immigration policies based on the exclusion of immigrants from particular countries or regions of the world.

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Published On: Sat, Jan 01, 2005 | Download File

Remembering December 17: Repeal of the 1882 Chinese Exclusion Act

December 17 marks the anniversary of the 1943 repeal by Congress of the Chinese Exclusion Act of May 6, 1882. With only a few exceptions, this law barred any Chinese from immigrating to the United States, and was the first time U.S. immigration policy singled out citizens of a particular nation for wholesale discrimination.

Published On: Wed, Dec 01, 2004 | Download File

From Denial to Acceptance: Effectively Regulating Immigration to the United States

U.S. immigration policy is based on denial. Most lawmakers in the United States have largely embraced the process of economic “globalization,” yet stubbornly refuse to acknowledge that increased migration, especially from developing nations to developed nations, is an integral and inevitable part of this process.

Published On: Mon, Nov 01, 2004 | Download File

Legal Fiction Denies Due Process to Immigrants

Over a thousand noncitizens face indefinite detention in the United States on the basis of a meaningless legal technicality.

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Published On: Fri, Oct 01, 2004 | Download File

Putting a Cap on Competitiveness: Arbitrary Limits on H-1B Visas Undermine U.S. Science and Engineer

Arbitrary congressional limits on the number of H-1B visas that can be granted annually to highly skilled foreign professionals may undermine the international competitiveness of U.S. science and technology.

Published On: Sun, Aug 01, 2004 | Download File

Maintaining A Competitive Edge: Foreign-Born and US Immigration Policies in Science and Engineering

Foreign-born scientists and engineers (S&Es) have long played a prominent role in U.S. technological and scientific advancement and are a critical part of the science and engineering (S&E) labor force in corporations, universities, and research centers nationwide. However, long-standing structural flaws in the U.S. visa system and the unintended consequences of security procedures instituted since September 11, 2001, may be causing an increasing number of S&Es to forgo coming to the United States, thereby depriving the nation of a critical supply of human talent.

Published On: Sun, Aug 01, 2004 | Download File

The Endless Wait: Will Resources Match the Resolve to Reduce the Immigration Case Backlog?

Congress and the White House have pledged for a decade to reduce the backlog of immigration cases, but without providing the resources necessary to do the job.

Published On: Thu, Jul 01, 2004 | Download File